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#1 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted December 17, 2011 - 10:19 AM

i tought myself to weld a few months ago and although i think they are pretty good for being recently self thought, i know they can be better so i was hoping you guys could through out some tips for me, and whoever else might read this post.

here is were i am now.
Posted Image

#2 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted December 17, 2011 - 12:11 PM

Two questions: One, what type of welder are you using? And two, was that piece in the position shown when you welded it?

#3 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted December 17, 2011 - 12:47 PM

Can't really give you much help but on the Miller , Hobart Welder sites and sure the others have good tips and correct uses of different welders , Al

#4 skyrydr2 ONLINE  

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Posted December 17, 2011 - 03:31 PM

That is a very effective weld, all I can say is practice, use both hands to hold the gun so you are smooth and steady, also try to maintain a uniform stick out, and angle . This all depends on material and position. It is so hard to make suggestions when your not able to actually be there. Everyone has their own speed and technics, and one may not work for one guy, where the other guy loves it. Your doing a good job, just keep practicing.:thumbs:

Edited by JDBrian, December 17, 2011 - 03:49 PM.
corrected typos


#5 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted December 17, 2011 - 07:19 PM

sorry i was in a rush when i posted, im using a hobart mig. yes i welded it in that position, a few days ago somebody on this ssite told me about welding uphill when its like that, i went downhill. i do use 2 hands when i can, i put my right hand on the button and my left hand in front of it a little.

#6 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted December 17, 2011 - 08:51 PM

I will say that's a nice looking weld. That said, an uphill weld will always be stronger than a downhill one. When you weld downhill, the impurities, or slag, get into the weld and cause flaws and weak spots. That doesn't mean that weld will ever break, but you should always make it as strong as it can be. It would appear that you used the right technique for a vertical (or up / down) weld. Pulsing the welder is the only way to run a vertical weld with a MIG. As far as the grip goes, the guy who taught me to weld said that the only important part of that is the correct angle into the weld and that you feel comfortable and stable enough to make a smooth pass start to finish. You're doing very good for a self taught beginner! Practice as often as you can and you will be a great welder as you seem to have a feel for the art already!
As was stated above, there are fantastic resources available from many of the manufacturers such as Miller and Lincoln. There is a lot to know about welding different materials and in various situations. Be careful and be safe!

#7 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted December 17, 2011 - 09:13 PM

thanks, ill look at some of the sites tomorrow. i try to find reasons to weld, soon im going to make a 3pt weight rack for mt 75 power king. its not exactly 100% necessarily needed urgently but... it will help plowing and i get to build something! next few days i hope.

#8 brokenfeather OFFLINE  

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Posted December 17, 2011 - 09:35 PM

I would be happy to get welds like that. Now that's not saying it couldn't be better but by golly it's going to hold them two parts till you cut them apart I would say. To get good at most anything it takes practice, practice, practice. Guess that was already stated.

#9 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted December 18, 2011 - 05:56 AM

That looks as good as a lot of mine. You're on the right track. Read up a little and put some more things together. Might turn into something you really enjoy doing.

#10 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted December 18, 2011 - 06:29 AM

I find that welding "up hill" is the way to go with a stick welder,but have found over the 28-30 years that I have been welding,that the MIG does better "down hill".
  • JDBrian said thank you

#11 smasher OFFLINE  

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Posted December 18, 2011 - 08:47 AM

Welding down hill with a mig is fine, since your using a shielding gas instead of flux theres no chance of slag inclusion

#12 skyrydr2 ONLINE  

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Posted December 18, 2011 - 10:34 AM

But welding down hill with a MIG leaves very little penetration . A MIG will weld up hill fine as long as you use a small wire (no bigger than .035) and the joint is clean for solid wires, or use a flux cored wire .035 or smaller. I almost always weld up hill when it is called for , unless it must be cosmeticly pretty , then I will do a second pass down hill. But usually I don't need to because the up hill pass looks great. It takes a lot of practice to get great up hill passes, so keep on welding , once you get it figured out you will be able to weld anything :thumbs:
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#13 Lovintractorin OFFLINE  

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Posted December 18, 2011 - 12:06 PM

But welding down hill with a MIG leaves very little penetration . A MIG will weld up hill fine as long as you use a small wire (no bigger than .035) and the joint is clean for solid wires, or use a flux cored wire .035 or smaller. I almost always weld up hill when it is called for , unless it must be cosmeticly pretty , then I will do a second pass down hill. But usually I don't need to because the up hill pass looks great. It takes a lot of practice to get great up hill passes, so keep on welding , once you get it figured out you will be able to weld anything :thumbs:


That is good to know. I am also a self taught mig welder and on vertical surfaces I weld downhill cause it looks better, but I'll keep trying uphill and see if I can improve.

#14 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted December 18, 2011 - 01:41 PM

that wasnt a but weld, they do over lap. there was color change on the back so there was at least some penetration.

#15 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted December 18, 2011 - 02:20 PM

Welding uphill is a tough thing to master, but if you use the spot weld method, it will look just as good as a downhil pass will. If you still don't like the way the weld looks, you can make a downhill pass over the top of your uphill weld to make it look "purty". The biggest problem with downhill welds, it is very hard not to have molten material sliding down the area you are trying to weld as you go downhill, this doesn't let you to get the deep penetration you are wanting. Discoloring the metal only means you got the metal hot, it doesn't always mean you got good penetration. I hope this helps....



BTW, I was the one telling you about uphill welding in your trailer thread. The weld looks strong, I was only trying to give you some help for the future. I think you have done a great job teaching yourself welding.:thumbs:
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