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A Simple "Weigh" to Add Weight to Your Tractor



10 Comments

An old garden sprayer can also be used to put the fluid into the tires. You will have to "burp" the tire once in a while, as air will also enter the tire with the fluid.

Most auto parts stores also have a "burp" valve (about $5) that can be screwed onto the Schrader valve and the fluid pumped (manually or mechanically) into the tire and the burp valve is used to expell the air so you can get as much fluid as possible into your tire(s).
    • iron Mike, Utah Smitty, Moosetales and 1 other said thanks
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Utah Smitty
Jul 05, 2012 11:37 PM

An old garden sprayer can also be used to put the fluid into the tires. You will have to "burp" the tire once in a while, as air will also enter the tire with the fluid.

Most auto parts stores also have a "burp" valve (about $5) that can be screwed onto the Schrader valve and the fluid pumped (manually or mechanically) into the tire and the burp valve is used to expell the air so you can get as much fluid as possible into your tire(s).


I hadn't thought of a garden sprayer. That would work a lot better than my method. I'll have to check into a burp valve as mom want me to put liquid in her rear tires on her GT18.

Thanks for sharing that...

Utah Smitty
Good right up US. I use the garden sprayer method to fill mine.
    • Huskyfan said thank you
I find a drill pump works great as well, as long as its not a battery drill (to slow). Usually use windsheild washer fluid works the same.
With tubeless tires I just break one of the beads on the valve stem side and with the tire lying flat pour the mixture directly into the tire between the tire and the bead using a funnel. When the tire is full to the top of the bead I introduce air throught the valve stem and reseat the tire on the rim. Be sure to wear eye protection when reseating the tire.
    • Utah Smitty, Huskyfan and X-Raycer have said thanks
Just wanted to share some more information regarding the reason Calcium (salt water) is used as a ballast in tractor tires, Salt mixed with water at about a 32 to 35% concentrate prevents water from freezing. Salt water is a very cheap and relatively no toxic liquid to mix and handle, so that is why most tire shops that load tractor tires choose to use Calcium. Of course the big down side to that is the fact that Calcium is very corrosive and if you have a tube or valve the leaks even a small amount it will destroy a rim within a few years. For Garden tractor tires because they do not hold that much ballast I agree with the idea of mixing your own solution of either engine antifreeze with water or RV Plumbing antifreeze for a ballist, that way you don't have to worry about the corrosion issue.
    • Huskyfan said thank you

Used RV antifreeze in the past, now in the future

for my WH chores! Great article, thank you for posting!

I used windshield washer fluid in mine. Made an "IV" setup using a piece of rope over the garage rafter, an old plastic gallon jug with the bottom cut off, and a piece of automotive fuel line through the cap (with a lot of duct tape holding it in place). I removed the valve core from the valve and slid the fuel line over the valve, where it fit snugly. My sidewalls on this tractor were stiff enough to support the weight of the tractor - you may need to use a jack. Filled the "IV" with WWF, stepped on the tire to "burp" it, and the tire sucked the WWF in. 

 

Bill

Quote: One alternative that would allow faster filling would be to break the tire from the wheel, and drill a 3/8" diameter hole for a new valve stem--I'd put it at the same location as the original valve stem, but on the opposite side of the wheel.

 I did this method and am glad I did. Now whether the tires are in narrow position for mowing or wide position for snow chain clearance, I have a valve stem on the outside of the wheel.

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WoodenNickle
Sep 18, 2014 11:50 AM

I filled my rear tires using the RV antifreeze years ago.  Someday I'll break one of the tires down to check for rust/corrosion.  But in the meantime, I've got all the traction I need.